Top 50 UK marketing and advertising Klout influencers on social media

Brand Republic

Brand Republic asked Klout to run the numbers on social media influencers in the UK’s marketing and advertising industry.

Klout looked at activity on social accounts (including content posted and reacted to, as well as follower and following accounts, among other things) on 21 July 2015 for the prior 90 days. They focussed on expertise in the following 15 topics: advertising; branding; communications; content marketing; digital media; email marketing; influencer marketing; internet marketing; marketing; mobile advertising; native advertising; online advertising; search advertising; social marketing and social media.

Whilst reading through the list on reaching #20 I spotted my @wellbelove account. 🙂

The article highlights that my feed spends more time share other peoples content. Of course. Being an informer rather than a meformer is key to being succesful on social media. With me you are not getting a sales pitch but a direct link to what I discover helping me, and you, ahead of the curb.

You can find the rest of the #Top 50 and more information in the Brand Republic article.  And thanks to Brand Republic and Klout for including me.

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Apple helps out all the ‘misunderstood’

A fantastic Christmas (holiday) video from Apple, which will be of great relief to all the misunderstood. Millions of memories are being captured everyday by the misunderstood so its good that at last they have been recognised.

Winning elections on-line

The US elections are continuing to demonstrate how the internet is playing an increasingly important role in engaging with voters. Research in the US has shown that 7% of on-line searchers may change their votes. In a close election what political parties do on-line could make the difference between winning and losing.

Democrat Barrack Obama has been heralded as changing the future of political campaigning. Michael Cheney, from the University of Illinois Institute of Government and Public Affairs, who studies online campaigning says that Barack Obama elevated the Internet’s social reach from novelty to necessity after Obama used it to build online grassroots support that helped fuel his rapid rise. Cheney believes that the use of social media has to be part of campaigns in the future and that candidates who don’t use this model aren’t going to be as succesful.

Google recognises this and has appointed a ‘head of elections and issues advocacy’ as sales of sponsored links go through the roof. For Google this is a huge opportunity to make money, for politicians looking for votes pay-per-click advertising is an easy way to reach potential voters.

It is no longer sufficient to build a website and upload press releases about how good you are and how terrible the opposition is. Messages have to cross multiple platforms in multiple formats. Supporters need to monitor and respond to discussions on-line. Candidates need to be taught not to be phased by the on-line chatter which could be disproportionally influenced by opponents who utilise the power of social networks such as Facebook and the many elections forums that grow in the run up to polling day.

Campaign strategist, plotting the progress of their campaign, need to use services such as Hitwise, to monitor traffic and searches for political websites which can give an indication of who is gaining ground in a campaign and the subject matters that the electorate are most interested in.

In the UK by the next general elections, and london local government elections in 2010, the internet will play a bigger part than ever before. And especially where the vote is close an election really could be won (or lost) on-line.